Fig. 1. Raphael, Santa Cecilia. Oil on panel transferred to canvas, 236 x 149 cm (ca. 1515 - 1516) Bologna, Pinacoteca Nazionale.

Late Raphael at the Prado, Madrid (until September 16th, 2012)

If we think of Raphael today—and that is a big “if”—our mental picture is probably of a painter of Madonnas or, perhaps, of the Raphael of his first Roman frescoes, which long epitomized academic art at its best. But these are works associated with the early to middle periods of the painter’s brief life (1483-1520) and do not tell the whole story of his evolution, one of the most remarkable in the history of western art. The splendid exhibition now on show at the Prado gives us a glimpse of the greatness Raphael achieved in his last decade even though it does not fully answer the question of who Raphael really was.

Still Life with Baer, at the Baer's Den, Adams, MA. Opening Saturday, June 2, 4-7 pm.

Still Life with Baer, open June 2, at Baer’s Den Bakery & Deli, 7 East Hoosac St., Adams, Massachusetts

STILL LIFE with BAER

Featured artists:

Joanna Gabler, Richard Harrington, Henry Klein,

David Lane, Bruce MacDonald, Barbara May, Emily May,

Ann McCallum, Michael Miller, Julia Morgan Leamon,

Viola Moriarty, Anna Moriarty Lev, Katherine Pavlis Porter,

Dan Rose, Martha Rose, Sam Wickstrom

Catered reception open to the public with refreshments

BAER’S DEN BAKERY & DELI

7 East Hoosac St. Adams, MA

Saturday, June 2nd, 4:00 to 7:00

For more information contact BAER’S DEN BAKERY & DELI:

Tel: (413) 776.7310

email : baersdenbakery@aol.com

Picasso at the Art Gallery of New South Wales

Amidst recent debate over whether the “blockbuster” art show is dead, alive, dying, waning or mutating, it takes a blockbuster to appreciate the value of a blockbuster. This is especially so in Australia, whose several fine museums all started collecting way too late to acumulate many of the great masters. As Edmund Capon said in a recent interview, the quirky array of names along the sandstone frieze of the Art Gallery of New South Wales — Raphael, Michael Angelo (sic), Bellini, Titian — are aspirational, a list of all the artists whose works “we don’t have.” He didn’t add that we never will have them, but there is a poignance to that list of names in bronze, a reminder of one “tyranny of distance” which was untraversable at the time of the gallery’s construction and remains so. Whether or not one of Australia’s mining billionaires ever finds the taste and generosity to buy one of our public galleries some minor Titian, Capon, retiring after thirty very successful years as director of the Gallery, can now justifiably brag that he leaves it “full of Picassos.”

Lucy MacGillis: “Casa” – New Paintings from Italy, at the Hoadley Gallery, Lenox, July 7 – August 2.

Lucy MacGillis grew up not far from Melville’s famous prospect of Mt. Greylock, surrounded by the rolling expanses, hills, and wooded slopes of the Berkshires. Since 2000 she has lived and worked in a small Umbrian town, Monte Castello di Vibio, not far from Todi, painting landscapes and familiar objects around her studio and the simple house where she lives. The distant views and the rooms of the house alike are filled with the clear, warm light of Umbria. As she explained to me, showing me photographs as illustrations, her point of departure is this all-encompassing light and its subtle changes through the course of the day and the seasons. Wherever she goes from there, she is guided by her eye. This visual experience, she says, slows down her painting, reflecting the slow, tranquil life in the town.

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