Calidore String Quartet. Photo: Marco Borggreve.

Public Concerts Resume at PS21 in Chatham, New York—Second Concert: Beethoven by the Calidore String Quartet

PS21 was founded by the late Judy Grunberg in 1999 with the mission of presenting advanced and diverse performances of music, dance, and theater, as well as some film screenings. Under her leadership as President of the Board, local residents and some from further away enjoyed lively summer programs performed in an ingenious plastic stage-cum-shelter in the middle of a field. Before her passing in 2019, she initiated the construction of an equally ingenious and certainly more elegant permanent structure which could be used from autumn through spring. A 300-seat theater open on three sides functions as the summer venue. Its stage house can be converted into a black box theater seating 99, providing a more intimate space for performances that need it. It was designed by a local architect, Evan Stoller, son of the legendary architectural photographer, Ezra Stoller.

Johann Sebastian Bach

Interview with Judy Grunberg and Yehuda Hanani – PS21 presents the 
7th Annual Paul Grunberg Memorial Bach Concert
, Saturday, June 16, 7.30 pm: Yehuda Hanani, cello; 
Emma Tahmizian, piano

Saturday, June 16, 7:30 pm
7th Annual Paul Grunberg Memorial Bach Concert
Yehuda Hanani, cello
Emma Tahmizian, piano
All Bach Program: Viola da Gamba Sonatas, Suite for Unaccompanied Cello, French Suite.
Yehuda Hanani’s charismatic playing and profound interpretations bring him acclaim and reengagements throughout Europe, North and South America, Asia and his native Israel.
Tahmizian’s international career was launched when she won the grand prize at the1977 Robert Schuman International Competition. She went on to win prizes in the Tchaikovsky, Leeds, Van Cliburn and Montreal competitions. She tours throughout the US and Europe in a wide variety of appearances.

Thornton Wilder’s Our Town, A co-production of Walking the Dog Theatre and PS21, directed by David Anderson

In the past week I have seen three plays, and each has been a play about community and/or family: Ödön von Horváth’s Judgment Day, part of Bard’s Summerfest, John Guare’s Six Degrees of Separation, and the quintessential play of small town American, Thornton Wilder’s Our Town. Horváth presents a small town as well, an Austro-Hungarian community poisoned and corrupted by its own preferences, which are fickle, of course, because the preferences depend on rumour and whim. Six Degrees of Separation explores an even scarier community, the impersonal environment of Manhattan, where standing, one thinks, has to be maintained on a daily basis, if one doesn’t want simply to disappear from the world. Our Town’s reputation as an American classic which resonates the true spirit of the simple life of rural New England has remained almost inviolable, although it is the work of a cosmopolitan homosexual who grew up in an intellectual mid-western family. His American simplicity came from his friend Gertrude Stein, not an intimate acquaintance with life in the Monadnock region. We accept it as a play that rings true, but, knowing that Our Town is anything but a series of impressions of the playwright’s youth in southern New Hampshire, I still find that Wilder can still get his audiences to meet him on his own terms. He is looking at his characters and their environment from a certain metaphysical distance.

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